Allegoria della Fortuna

Posted in Painting on October 20, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

fortuna

Florentine School
oil on panel, 16th century
Gallerie degli Uffizi
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Fortuna

Posted in Painting with tags on October 18, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Peter Paul Rubens
oil on canvas, 1636-38
Museo Nacional del Prado

Heiliger Stephan, König von Ungarn

Posted in Painting with tags , on August 16, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Cranach, St.Stephen

Lucas Cranach
oil on panel, c. 1510
Germanisches National Museum, Nürnberg

Eternal Greece

Posted in Greece, Greek Myth, Painting, Poetry with tags , on July 27, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

titian-christ

Our land is the land of immortal spirits and idols
Apollo, full of joy and supreme, is our god.

Christ crucified, lying in his white winding-sheet,
is beautiful Adonis covered with roses.

The soul of ancient Greece lives hidden unwillingly within us.
Great Pan is not dead, no, great Pan does not die!

Text: Kostis Palamas, Iamboi kai Anapaistoi. Athens, 1920
Image: Titian, Il Cristo risuscitato, c. 1511

Santa Rufina

Posted in Painting with tags , on July 19, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Velazquez, Santa Rufina

Diego Velázquez
oil on canvas, c. 1630
Hospital de los Venerables, Seville

The Silver Age

Posted in Greek Myth, Painting, Poetry with tags , on July 19, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Corot, Sodom

The second age came after,
and it was much worse.
This silver age of men was made by the immortals
who have palaces on Olympus.
Neither in body nor mind
did they resemble the golden age.
For one hundred years,
each child stayed with its mother.
For one hundred years, she had to raise it,
fussing over it at home, a big dumb child.
Then when it passed puberty,
that measure of youthful prime,
it didn’t live much longer.
Sufferings were brought on
because of their deeply ingrained,
habitually adolescent stupidity. Reckless violence
could not be restrained between them.
As for service to the immortals,
they were unwilling to give it.
They offered no sacrifice on the altars of the blessed.
But sacred law decrees that humans offer sacrifice,
as is our custom. Therefore Zeus,
the son of Cronus, in a just anger, made them disappear.
They refused to give honors
to the blessed gods who hold Olympus.
And for that reason they had to die.

Text: Hesiod, Theogony/Works and Days, translated by C. S. Morrissey. Vancouver: Talon Books, 2012
Image: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, L’incendie de Sodome, oil on canvas, 1843 and 1857, Metropolitan Museum

Man in the stream…

Posted in Painting, Poetry with tags , on July 17, 2017 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Poussin_Landscape_with_Saint_John_on_Patmos

Man in the stream of his mysterious life
Has left to his descendants patterns various and worthy of his
immortal origin
As he has also left traces of the ruins of daybreak,
snowdrifts of heavenly reptiles, paper eagles, diamonds and
the glances of hyacinths
In the midst of sighs, of tears, of hunger, of lamentations
and of the ash of wells under the earth.

Text: Nikos Gatsos, Amorgos, translated by Sally Purcell. London: Anvil Press, 2006
Image: Nicolas Poussin, Paysage avec Saint Jean à Patmos, oil on canvas, 1660, Art Institute of Chicago