Happy Birthday Ivry

Posted in Music with tags on August 25, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

ivry
Eighty-eight years ago a little boy named Ivry Gitlis posed for this photograph. The place was Haifa, Mandatory Palestine; the year 1928 and the world somewhat different from the one we inhabit now, but Ivry is still among us. I am very lucky to have met such a man. Mazel tov Ivry!

Temple of Olympian Zeus, c. 1847

Posted in Greece, Photo with tags , , , on August 25, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
Philippos Margaritis & Philibert Perraud, Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens, c. 1847, J. Paul Getty Museum
Philippos Margaritis and Philibert Perraud
Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens
Daguerreotype, c. 1847
J. Paul Getty Museum

Still Life by Daguerre

Posted in Art, Photo, Still Life with tags , on August 22, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
Louis Daguerre, 1839
Louis Daguerre, Still life, 1837
Louis Daguerre, Still life, 1839
Louis Daguerre, Still life, 1839a
Daguerreotypes, 1837-39

Louis Daguerre’s first experiments with the new process he had discovered look not forward but back, to the aesthetic traditions of the museum and wunderkammer, perfectly illustrating the confluence of arts and sciences that gave birth to the hybrid technique of photography.

Poe in Providence

Posted in Photo, Writing with tags , on August 21, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
Anon, Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe, 1848, American Antiquarian SocAnon, Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe, 1848, American Antiquarian Soc, rev
American Antiquarian Society

Another iconic image of Edgar Allan Poe, looking every inch the ill-starred poet. Taken in Providence, Rhode Island in 1848, it has a rather magnificent case.

Edgar Allan Poe in Daguerreotypes

Posted in Photo, Writing with tags , on August 21, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
Brown_University_Library
Daguerreotype by William Hartshorn, 1848
Brown University Library
Anon, Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe, late May - early June 1849, J. Paul Getty Museum-a
Anonymous daguerreotype, May-June 1849
J. Paul Getty Museum
Anon, Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe, late May - early June 1849, J. Paul Getty Museum-b
detail

The familiar image of Edgar Allan Poe is vouchsafed us almost entirely through the medium of daguerreotypy. The pioneering American author sat for several portraits in his later life, which coincided with the dominance of Daguerre’s process. The Brown daguerreotype was made at the end of “a tumultuous week which included an overdose of laudanum and a bout of heavy drinking.” Poe died in 1849, just four months after the Getty daguerreotype was taken. Poe was not only the first great American author to attempt to live by writing alone, but the first whose photographic representation made him a visual as well as a literary icon.

Frederick Douglass in Daguerreotypes

Posted in Photo with tags , , on August 20, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
Anon, Portrait of Frederick Douglass, 1848, Chester Co Hist Soc
Anonymous, 1848, Chester County Historical Society

Samuel J. Miller, Frederick Douglass, 1852, Daguerreotype. Art Institute of Chicago.
Samuel J. Miller, 1847/52, Art Institute of Chicago

Anon, Portrait of Frederick Douglass, c. 1855, Met
Anonymous, c. 1855, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Anon, Portrait of Frederick Douglass, c. 1855, Nelson
Anonymous, c. 1855, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

The great abolitionist leader and statesman Frederick Douglass is claimed as the most-photographed American of the 19th century. He was certainly a frequent visitor to the photographic studios of the day and these are just a few of the magnificent portraits for which he posed throughout a long life in the public eye. Douglass seems to have loved the camera and the feeling was mutual: the majestic figure he cut in images such as these may well have been as influential as his words in asserting the dignity and equality of African-Americans.

Boulevard du Temple

Posted in Photo with tags , , , on August 19, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
Louis Daguerre, Boulevard du Temple, c.1838-39a
Louis Daguerre
Boulevard du Temple, c. 1838-39

One of Daguerre’s few surviving originals. The two figures on the corner of the street, one of whom appears to be having his shoes shined by the other, are believed to be the first humans ever photographed. The crowds thronging this busy Parisian thoroughfare were obliterated in their haste by the long exposure time Daguerre’s early process required.

Louis Daguerre, Boulevard du Temple, c.1838-39b
detail
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