Archive for Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

l’Adorazione dei Magi

Posted in Drawing with tags on December 27, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

giovanni_battista_tiepolo_-_adoration_of_the_magi

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
pen and wash drawing, date unknown
Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University

l’Adorazione dei Magi

Posted in Painting with tags on December 26, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

gbtiepolo-adoration-met

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
oil on canvas, c. 1758-59
Metropolitan Museum

l’Adorazione dei Magi

Posted in Drawing with tags on December 25, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

adoration_of_the_magi

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
etching, c. 1740-50
Cincinnati Art Museum

Religion is valid poetry…

Posted in Painting, Philosophy with tags , on November 18, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

giovanni-battista-tiepolo-allegory-of-the-planets-and-continents-1752-met

“…morality and spirit, in my view, express specific and contrary vital interests, as in politics. To assert that one such political or vital interest, say the Jewish or the Anglo-Saxon, coincides with the total inspiration of the universe, is egotism in excelsis, and a plain illusion of animal vanity and egotism. Banish that illusion: the vital and political interest concerned remains standing, but only as one local and temporary movement of animal life on earth. It is its own excuse for being, but it leaves the speculative spirit free to transcend it and to admit equally, in their places, all the other vital and political interests that may arise. I would relax English prejudices in the Catholic and naturalistic direction by a single and consistent insight, not by casual contrary sympathies. Catholicism is paganism spiritualised: it is fundamentally naturalistic; and the transcendental spirit and the wise statesman may accept Catholicism, where it naturally arises, as a good poetic symbol for the forces and the issues of human life in that phase; not, however, as a scientific revelation of reality or a history of literal facts. Religion is valid poetry infused into common life. It is not a revelation truer than perception or than science. Nature, where it breeds life, is undoubtedly animated by a spirit kindred to man’s and to human morality; hence the dramatic sympathy in us with all real or imagined vitality in the universe. Yet this sympathy should chasten rather than inflate us, because it reveals to us how accidental are the objects of our love.”

Text: George Santayana, My Host the World. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1953
Image: Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Allegoria dei pianeti e continenti, 1752, Metropolitan Museum

The Gods of the Copybook Headings

Posted in Painting, Philosophy, Poetry with tags , on October 26, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

AS I PASS through my incarnations in every age and race,
I make my proper prostrations to the Gods of the Market Place.
Peering through reverent fingers I watch them flourish and fall,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings, I notice, outlast them all.
We were living in trees when they met us. They showed us each in turn
That Water would certainly wet us, as Fire would certainly burn:
But we found them lacking in Uplift, Vision and Breadth of Mind,
So we left them to teach the Gorillas while we followed the March of Mankind.
We moved as the Spirit listed. They never altered their pace,
Being neither cloud nor wind-borne like the Gods of the Market Place,
But they always caught up with our progress, and presently word would come
That a tribe had been wiped off its icefield, or the lights had gone out in Rome.
With the Hopes that our World is built on they were utterly out of touch,
They denied that the Moon was Stilton; they denied she was even Dutch;
They denied that Wishes were Horses; they denied that a Pig had Wings;
So we worshipped the Gods of the Market Who promised these beautiful things.
When the Cambrian measures were forming, They promised perpetual peace.
They swore, if we gave them our weapons, that the wars of the tribes would cease.
But when we disarmed They sold us and delivered us bound to our foe,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “Stick to the Devil you know.”
On the first Feminian Sandstones we were promised the Fuller Life
(Which started by loving our neighbour and ended by loving his wife)
Till our women had no more children and the men lost reason and faith,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “The Wages of Sin is Death.”
In the Carboniferous Epoch we were promised abundance for all,
By robbing selected Peter to pay for collective Paul;
But, though we had plenty of money, there was nothing our money could buy,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “If you don’t work you die.”
Then the Gods of the Market tumbled, and their smooth-tongued wizards withdrew
And the hearts of the meanest were humbled and began to believe it was true
That All is not Gold that Glitters, and Two and Two make Four
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings limped up to explain it once more.
As it will be in the future, it was at the birth of Man
There are only four things certain since Social Progress began.
That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire,
And the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire;
And that after this is accomplished, and the brave new world begins
When all men are paid for existing and no man must pay for his sins,
As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn,
The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return!
Text: Rudyard Kipling, “The Gods of the Copybook Headings”, Sunday Pictorial 26 October 1919
Image: Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, The Procession of the Trojan Horse into Troy, c. 1760, National Gallery, London

Assumption III

Posted in Painting with tags on August 16, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

l'Assunzione della Virgine - Oratoria della Purita, Udine
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
L’Assunzione della Virgine, c. 1725
Chiesa della Purità, Udine

Sonnet LIII

Posted in Painting, Poetry with tags , on December 18, 2015 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Alexander the Great and Campaspe in the Studio of Apelles, c. 1740

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Alexander the Great and Campaspe in the Studio of Apelles, c. 1740
The J. Paul Getty Museum

What is your ſubstance,whereof are you made,
That millions of ſtrange ſhaddowes on you tend?
Since euery one,hath euery one,one ſhade,
And you but one,can euery ſhaddow lend:
Deſcribe Adonis and the counterfet,
Is poorely immitated after you,
On Hellens cheeke all art of beautie ſet,
And you in Grecian tires are painted new:
Speake of the ſpring,and foyzon of the yeare,
The one doth ſhaddow of your beautie ſhow,
The other as your bountie doth appeare,
And you in euery bleſſed ſhape we know.
     In all externall grace you haue ſome part,
     But you like none,none you for conſtant heart.

Text from the 1609 Quarto Version