Archive for the Photo Category

Leonard Cohen’s Hydra

Posted in Music, Photo with tags on November 13, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

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Not knowing quite how to respond to the death of an artist who has meant so much to us we have chosen, in no particular order, some photographs from Leonard Cohen’s life on Hydra, the Greek island where we also have lived many ancient and instantaneous hours. And yes we have sung Suzanne there, in an open boat in the old harbour under the Milky Way. May his memory be a blessing.

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Magic Mirror

Posted in Music, Photo with tags on November 13, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

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Robert Frank 92

Posted in Book, Photo with tags on November 9, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

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Today we congratulate Robert Frank on his 92nd birthday. The Swiss-born photographer became a tireless and penetrating investigator of American life, crisscrossing the nation and depicting it from every angle. His work is too well-known to require any comment from us, apart from the suggestion that now seems an important moment to contemplate the state of the Union, in the mirror of Frank’s lens and otherwise.

Images: Portrait of Robert Frank, © Wayne Miller/Magnum; all others © Robert Frank

Homme barbu (Clésinger) à l’allure sombre

Posted in Photo with tags , , on November 6, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

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Gustave Le Gray
daguerreotype, 1848
Private Collection?

The Acropolis

Posted in Architecture, Greece, Photo with tags , , on October 12, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
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Félix Bonfils
photograph, c. 1868-75
Princeton University Library
We find this a particularly evocative old view of the Acropolis, across mostly vacant fields now embedded in the hectic center of modern Athens; and we imagine the generations of slow feet that carved the path between the Temple of Olympian Zeus and the rustic buildings in the foreground. The next time we visit Athens, which will hopefully be soon, we will search for traces of that lost road.

שנה טובה

Posted in Photo with tags , , on October 2, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Photo of Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue

Francis Frith & Co. in Athens

Posted in Greece, Photo with tags , , on September 2, 2016 by Dylan Thomas Hayden
F. Frith & Co., Arch of Hadrian, c. 1850s-1870s, V&A
The Arch of Hadrian, with the Temple of Olympian Zeus beyond
F. Frith & Co., Temple of Olympian Zeus, c. 1850s-1870s, V&A
The Temple of Olympian Zeus

F. Frith & Co., The Acropolis 1850-1870s, V&A
The Acropolis

F. Frith & Co., The Parthenon, c. 1850s-1870s, V&A
The Parthenon
F. Frith & Co., Modern Athens, c. 1850s-1870s, V&A
A beautiful study of “Modern Athens”

Francis Frith (1822-1898) found his first fame as a photographer in the 1850s with a great series of pictures created during long tours of the Middle East. These views were both a technical and an artistic triumph: it was extremely difficult to achieve fine results with the wet collodion process in those dry and dusty climes; and he devoted a great deal of thought and effort to capturing the essence of his scenes and subjects while excluding extraneous elements from the frame. This achievement makes him perhaps the first and certainly among the greatest masters of the topographical view.

At the end of his travels Frith established Francis Frith & Co., the world’s first specialist photographic publisher, and embarked on an enormous project to photograph every town and village in the United Kingdom. The resulting images are still widely reproduced today and in the form of postcards are a staple of souvenir shops all over Britain, their ubiquity evoking the image of Frith as a sort of photographic Phileas Fogg, ceaselessly travelling the land while recording every stop along the way. In reality the growing size and success of his enterprise necessitated the hiring of many photographers as well as the wholesale purchase of existing archives, including images from many lands. Thus it is unknown just when and by whom these Athenian scenes were preserved. They form but a small part of the more than 4000 prints acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum directly from Francis Frith & Co. in 1954.