Archive for the André Breton Category

Cadavre #24

Posted in André Breton, Cadavre Exquis, Drawing, Surrealism with tags , on November 17, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Cadavre #23

Posted in André Breton, Cadavre Exquis, Drawing, Surrealism with tags , on November 10, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Portrait d’André Breton , 1929

Posted in André Breton, Painting, Surrealism with tags on November 7, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Cadavre #22

Posted in André Breton, Cadavre Exquis, Drawing, Surrealism with tags , , on November 3, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Sans titre, c. 1940

Posted in André Breton, Collage, Surrealism on November 3, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

La Liberté éclairant le monde

Posted in André Breton, Poetry, Surrealism with tags on October 15, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden


The first collection of Breton’s poetry in English translation, published by New Editions, New York, 1946

Tarot Matta-Breton

Posted in André Breton, Object, Surrealism with tags , on October 11, 2014 by Dylan Thomas Hayden

Les Amoureux
Le Chariot
La Lune
Les etoiles
André Breton and Roberto Matta Echaurren

This is another example of the surrealist passion for tarot. The title of Breton’s long prose poem, Arcane 17, refers to tarot card 17, the “stars” card (Les étoiles), usually a symbol of free-flowing love and renewal of forces. However, Breton’s imagination brought new associations, multiplying the morning stars and infusing them with fluid meanings. Breton describes the figure in the center of the card as a naked young woman kneeling as she pours out the contents of two urns, one into a pond, the other onto the ground. He associates this woman with the legendary figure of Mélusine, a legendary mermaid who became a symbol of the difficulty to reconcile “reality” and “magic.” There is hope, however, that the “inexhaustible” urns could renew our disenchanted world. Indeed, even though the pond gives off the “pestilential odor” of social conventions, it is still longing for “a new dream.” The fragile butterfly is another symbol of “consoling mystery.” Chilean painter Roberto Matta designed the four colorful illustrations in the shape and size of tarot cards (or “arcanas”) pasted in the book.

Published by Brentano’s, New York, 1945

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